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Home » Archive » 2008

TDK conference 2008

A survey of the evidence of adenoviruses and herpesviruses in mammalian predators (carnivora) with PCR
Dandár Eszter - year 5
MTA-ÁOTKI; MTA-ÁOTKI; SZIE-ÁOTK Institute of Biology, Department of Ecology
Supervisors: Mária Benkő, Andor Doszpoly,, Nóra Vili

Abstract:

Although adenoviruses and herpesviruses are common in vertebrates, there is only a limited amount of molecular diagnostic studies to provide a sound support for the results of previous serological research. There has been reported only two Canine Adenovirus from Carnivores, but these viruses occurred also in other host species (fox, bear, raccoon, skunk). In predators no species-specific adenovirus has been reported. herpesviruses were identified from several evolutionary important animal taxa such as mollusks, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The aim of my research is to explore the adenoviruses and herpesviruses of mammalian predators.

I sampled viruses from the organs of dead animals, and fresh excrement collected in zoos. After extracting DNA, I used a two circled (nested) PCR. I amplified a partial sequence of the adenoviral or herpesviral DNA polimerase genes. I purified PCR products of positive reactions. The nucleotide sequences were relatively small size (about 300 base pairs from adenoviruses, and 200 base pairs from herpesviruses), but they were generally suitable for genus classification of the detected viruses.

Adenoviruses were detected from 73 samples. I acquired most samples from jackals (Canis aureus), but I had samples from tiger (Panthera tigris), lynx (Lynx lynx), cat (Felis catus), serval (Felis serval), fox (Vulpes vulpes), wolf (Canis lupus), forest dog (Speothos venaticus), indian wild dog (Cuon dukhunensis), hyena (Crocuta crocuta), brown bear (Ursus arctos), proboscian bear (Nasua nasua), polar bear (Ursus maritimus), red panda (Ailurus fulgens), badger (Meles meles), and beech-marten (Martes martes). Two out of these were positive in 2 jackals. Sequence analysis showed that both adenoviruses could be classified as the Canine Adenovirus-2. These viruses may cause mild respiratory symptomps in mammals and especially in dogs. The source of infection of wild mammals may be domestic dogs.

Furthermore, one sample from a badger was also positive. This sample is likely to contain the Mustelide herpesvirus-1, included in the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily.



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