Students' Research Circle    
 
 
2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
» 2011
The conference
Veterinary Session
Veterinary Jury
Biology Session
Biology Jury
Sponsors
Awards-list
Application
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
Home » Archive » 2011

TDK conference 2011

Toxic effects of sulfamethoxazole and ketoprofen on African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis, Daudin 1802) tadpoles
Nagyová Anabela - year 4
Szent István University Faculty of Veterinary Science Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Supervisors: Dr. Baska Ferenc, Dr. Lehel József

Abstract:

The series of experiments discussed in this paper were undertaken as a part of eco- and clinical toxicology listed in experiment profile of the Department of Veterinary Public Health and Toxicology Laboratory at the University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences in Brno.

The objective of present research, the toxic, mutagenic and teratogenic effects of ketoprofen and sulfamethoxazole, have been increasingly studied in various animal species (fishes, frogs, rats and monkeys), there remains much to be concluded. In particular, not much literature with research data is available on African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), although it is an important model organism for studies of the teratogenic effects.

The equipment and experiments were designed and conducted as described in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E1439–98 (96-hour FETAX test).

Results from the present study demonstrate that ketoprofen and sulfamethoxazole have equally a potential of teratogenic effects on model of African clawed frog. An overwhelming majority of axial abnormalities and occurrences of edema were observed in larvae during our research. At sulfamethoxazole concentrations of 150 mg/L and 250 mg/L a spinal curvature was detected in 17.39 and 32.95% of tested frog embryos, respectively. At ketoprofen concentration of 10 mg/L an occurrence of edema was found in 77.55% of frog embryos used in these experiments. In small number of cases, the malformation of face, eye, gut and pigment abnormalities have occurred. The treatment of frog embryos with ketoprofen concentration of 250 mg/L produced also a two-headed tadpole.

All statistical data were calculated with ketoprofen LC50 and EC50 values (12.1 mg/ L and 5.67 mg/L) in 96h FETAX. About 90% of mortality was reported, when using ketoprofen concentration of 15 mg/L. Since 50% lethality was not observed even at the highest tested doses of sulfamethoxazole, LC10 (200 mg/L) and EC10 (132.85 mg/L) values were estimated as endpoints.

These data may contribute to safe and effective use of different active substances in medicine. We hope that our findings will be used to provide baseline data for food safety issues. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings, especially in the case of ketoprofen, and we plan to continue in series of experiments involving new active substances



List of lectures