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Home » Archive » 2015

TDK conference 2015

Factors influencing the incidence of anovulatory follicles in embryo transfer recipient mares.
Cox Rebecca - year 4
SzIU, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Department of Obstetrics and Reproduction
Supervisor: Solti Laszlo DVM

Abstract:

The occurrence of anovulatory follicles in the mare is synonymous with ovulation failure and is a noteworthy cause of reproductive inefficiency and economic loss. Since the affected mares do not ovulate, fertilization or in this case synchronization with the donor mare/s and subsequent pregnancy or embryo transfer cannot occur. Little is known about the nature and factors affecting the incidence of anovulatory follicles in mares. It is therefore difficult to predict whether a follicle is destined for ovulation failure.

The objective of this study was to look at the local meteorological data at the time of anovulatory follicle/s to see if any correlation or trend could be found between them. The reproductive records of 95 recipient mares with a total of 214 anovulatory cycles were analysed in a retrospective study. The records are from 2006-2015 during the months of March to October. Each recipient mare had had between 1-9 anovulatory cycles. Of the meteorological data 5 variables were considered; temperature high, temperature low, rainfall, humidity high and humidity low. Linear regression was used to find the connection between variables and the log of the frequency of anovulatory follicles.

The results showed no statistical significance however some visible trends were seen. The lowest temperature had no significant effect of the logarithm of anovulatory follicles (p=0.124). The highest temperature was nearly significant on the logarithm of anovulatory follicles (p=0.0673). The rainfall had no significant effect of the logarithm of anovulatory follicles (p=0.33). The low humidity had no significant effect of the logarithm of anovulatory follicles (p=0.382). The high humidity had no significant effect of the logarithm of anovulatory follicles (p=0.172).

As some visible trends were seen, we could suggest that meteorological data may have some effect on the prevalence of anovulatory follicles. Higher temperatures appeared to decrease the chance of anovulatory follicles with this log-scale model being nearly significant. However, several other factors may still contribute to the incidence of these anovulatory follicles in mares.



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