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Home » Archive » 2015

TDK conference 2015

Food safety aspects of enviromental polluting heavy metals in deer
Zwillinger Dóra - year 6
SzIU, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Department of Food Hygiene
Supervisor: József Lehel DVM

Abstract:

Present days the environment pollutant effect of metals and their concentration in the food-chain are very important from the aspect of healthcare, due to their accumulative properties.

Various metals, such as heavy metals occur in the environment as a natural component, however, they can primarily get into the foods of animal origin and the body of the human consumer via antropogenic (industrial and agricultural) activity.

Game meat is increasingly popular among consumers, due to the more favourable and healthy content. At the same time, it is considerable if accumulation of heavy metals in the game meat means a food-toxicological risk in the case of over-average game meat consumption.

We detected environment polluting heavy metals from the roe deer of a hunting area near Ecser. The samples of muscle, liver, kidney and fat were collected from ten-ten healthy animals of both sexes between 15. 04. 2014 and 30. 09. 2014 (males), and 01. 10. 2014 and the last day of February 2015 (females). Arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead content of the samples were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Statistical evaluation of the results was performed by multi-way ANOVA, Fisher’s exact test and two-sample t-test (R statistical program, version 3.1.3.).

The concentration of arsenic and mercury was below the limit of detection (<0.5 mg/kg) in every sample (muscle, liver, kidney, fat) of both sex.

The amount of cadmium was significantly higher in the kidney (1.03±0.52 mg/kg; p<0.001), liver (0.13±0.04 mg/kg; p=0.0031) and muscle (0.06±0.01 mg/kg; p=0.0031) of males, than in females (kidney: 0.25±0.20 mg/kg; liver: 0.06±0.01 mg/kg; fat: <0.05 mg/kg). The measured values in males’ samples were above the officially permitted maximal limit for kidney (1.00 mg/kg) and muscle (0.05 mg/kg).

The concentration of lead in the liver (male: 1.10±2.24 mg/kg; female: 2.24±3.92 mg/kg) and in the muscle (male: 0.59±0.20 mg/kg; female: 33.78±96.49 mg/kg) exceeded the regulated maximal levels (liver: 0.50 mg/kg; muscle: 0.10 mg/kg). Amounts measured in the kidney were above the limit value (0.50 mg/kg) only in case of females (0.74±0.23 mg/kg). It was statistically proven (p<0.05) that the lead was present in significantly higher concentrations in organs and tissues of females compared to males.

According to our data, the consumption of organs and tissues of the studied roe deer is objectionable from food-toxicological aspect and means a risk to the consumer due to the lead and cadmium contents which exceed the legal tolerable limits.



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