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Home » Archive » 2015

TDK conference 2015

A comparative study of the astroglia of Squamata and Testudines based on GFAP immunohistochemistry
Lőrincz Dávid Lajos - year 3
SU, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology; SzIU, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Institute for Biology, Department of Ecology
Supervisors: Mihály Kálmán MD, Diána Csonka

Abstract:

Squamata belong to diapsid reptiles. Testudines were positioned formerly to the most ancient group Anapsida but several recent studies classify them as diapsids. Of both orders we have studied more species, such as lizards: Timon tangitanus (Lacertidae), Pogona vitticeps (Agamidae), Eublepharis macularis (Eublepharidae, as a representative of geckos), Chameleo calypratus (Chameleonidae) and snakes: Epicrates cenchria maurus (Boidae), Python regius (Pythonidae), Pantherophis guttata and P. obsoletus quadrivittatus (Colubridae) and turtles: Testudo hermanni (Testudinidae), Trachemys scripta (Emydidae), Mauremys sinensis (Geoemydidae), as hide-neck trutles (Cryptodira) and a side-neck turtle (Pleurodira): Pelomedusa subrufa (Pelomedusidae). They were overanasthetised with Nembutal and transcardially perfused with 4% buffered paraformaldehyde solution. Coronal sections were processed according to the immunoperoxidase protocol to detect astroglial markers: GFAP (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein), glutamin-sytethase, S-100 protein and vimentin.

The main astroglia were radial ependymoglia which were however penetrated by non-radial long glial processes around the large vessels. We have found two principal advances in Squamata: a) astrocytes were frequent in several areas, although nowhere predominated; b) considerable GFAP-poor areas were found. These areas were extended in python and in agama and GFAP was almost missing throughout the brain in the chameleon.

The extended GFAP-poor areas of Squamata resemble the bird brains rather than the turtle ones, although Squamata and birds represent separate diapsid branches (Lepidosauria versus Archosauria). In mammals and birds the GFAP-free areas are usually advanced, expanded and plastic ones, however their evolutionary and functional importance has not been understood yet. In Squamata the large GFAP-poor areas may correlate with that their behaviour is quite complex related to that of other reptiles.



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