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Home » Archive » 2016

TDK conference 2016

Improving the protective effect of vaccination with fulvic acid and sanguinarine in broiler chicken stock
Sarkadi István László - year 4
University of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Physiology and Biochemistry
Supervisor: Dr. György Csikó

Abstract:

Administration of feed or drinking water additives in chicken stock promotes the health and improves the immune system of the animals, these substances can be used for growth promotion as well. Disease prevention is the main goal of using these supplementations. The fowl cholera caused by Pasteurella multocida is one of the major causes of economic losses in chicken industry. Vaccination against this microorganism is not entirely effective.

Fulvic acid and Sangrovit® were used as drinking water supplements in our investigations. Fulvic acid is one of the most active fractions of humic substances, and sanguinarine is a benzophenanthidrine alkaloid compound derived from the plant five-seeded plume-poppy (Macleaya cordata).

The aim of our study was to enhance the protective effect of the P. multocida vaccine with drinking water supplements; fulvic acid and sanguinarine in chicken stock.

The experimental design was as follows. Fifty broiler chickens were divided into five groups, ten individuals per group. Four groups were administered via drinking water either with Sangrovit or Fulvix pulvis in dose of 5 or 25 mg/kg body weight, respectively, two groups were treated for five consecutive days, and two groups were administered for ten consecutive days. The controls were given drinking water without any supplementation. Every animal was inoculated with P. multocida vaccine twice. One month-old broiler chickens were inoculated first, and three weeks later it was followed by a second vaccination. Blood samples were collected after both inoculations, and P. multocida antibody titer was determined in each individuals.

The P. multocida antibody level of all groups was maintained until the second vaccination, but difference from the control animals was not occurred. Nonetheless the 10-day long Sangrovit treatment and both the 5- and 10-day long Fulvix pulvis treatment increased the P. multocida antibody titer.

It is important to enhance the antibody formation due to vaccination to maintain the health of the animals and prevent the stock from disease outbreak. Supplementation of drinking water with either Sangrovit or Fulvix pulvis appears to be a suitable tool for improve the effect of the P. multocida vaccine in chickens.



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