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Home » Archive » 2018

TDK conference 2018

Study on the lungworm infections of domestic cats
Kiszely Sára - year 6
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Parasitology and Zoology
Supervisor: Dr. Róbert Farkas

Abstract:

The lungworm infections of domestic cats caused by roundworm species can occur worldwide. Based on the literature, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus has been found in most reported cases. Oslerus rostratus, Eucoleus aerophilus or Troglostrongylus spp. can also infect the animals rarely. In the last decade the lungworm infection has been diagnosed more frequently in domestic cats in Europe. It is explained with the suitable climate for the intermediate hosts of some above mentioned parasite species. In Hungary only some sporadic cases of this parasitosis have been reported. Therefore, the aim of our studies was to get an up-to-date data about the occurrance of the lungworm infections in domestic cats and the parasites species.

In the last two years faecal samples were collected from 303 cats living in 61 settlements of the country. At the time with sampling the most important datas of cats were recorded. The eggs and the first stage larvae of the lungworms were examined with flotation technique and the Baermann method, respectively.

Altogether 60 (19.8%) cats from 18 settlements were found to be infected with lungworms. The first stage larvae of A. abstrusus were identified in their faecal samples. Three out of these cats were also infected with O. rostratus. To the best of our knowlegde this roundworm species was found first time in Hungary. The ratio of the infected males and females was almost the same (19.1% and 20.8%). Significantly (P<0.05) fewer neutered cats were infected than the others. Among the younger (<5 year-old) animals significantly (P<0.05) more cats had lungworm infection than the older ones. Significant (P<0.05) connection was found between the number of the infected animals and their lifestyles. The prevalence of this parasitosis was 25.3% and 2.7% in cats lived outdoor or only indoor, respectively. Majority of the infected animals (68.3%) did not show any respiratory signs.



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