Students' Research Circle    
 
 
2022
2021
2020
2019
» 2018
Call for papers
The conference
Veterinary Session
Veterinary Jury
Biology Session
Biology Jury
Sponsors
Awards-list
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
Home » Archive » 2018

TDK conference 2018

To eat or not to eat? – Food safety aspects of essential metals in seafood
Magyar Márta Szilvia - year 5
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Food Hygiene
Supervisor: Dr. József Lehel

Abstract:

Recently, the popularity of seafood is highly increased. They are becoming more and more sought after due to their superb dietary properties and healthy composition. Given that seafood takes up a growing proportion of mean consumed by humans per annum, it is crucial to have an understanding of whether they adequately contribute to our essential nutritional needs.

Small amounts of essential metals are indispensable in human body to proper physiological functioning. Their deficiency can manifest in various sets of symptoms that can only be eliminated with intake of those metals that are lacking during the treatment or nutrition. However, excessive consumption of metals can induce undesirable effects or even toxicosis.

Shellfish, oyster and squid samples were collected directly from a fish market for 20 weeks from March to July. After sample preparation the concentration of essential metals (cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, zinc) in animals was detected by ICP-OES method. The results were analysed statistically using ANOVA and 2-sample t-tests.

The level of zinc found in oysters (202.64±15.16 mg/kg wet weight, w.w.) was significantly higher (p<0.001) than in shellfish (24.96±3.13 mg/kg w.w.) and in squid (11.31±0.26 mg/kg w.w.). Likewise, oysters contained significantly (p<0.001) higher amount of copper (16.46±2.29 mg/kg w.w.) than shellfish (1.16±0.10 mg/kg w.w.) and squid (7.19±0.89 mg/kg w.w.). Similar tendency was observed in case of manganese (oyster: 4.88±0.52 mg/kg w.w., p<0.001; shellfish: 1.65±0.20 mg/kg w.w.; squid: 0.29±0.03 mg/kg w.w.). The concentration of cobalt, chromium, molybdenum and nickel detected under the limit of detection was 50%.

The average concentration of the investigated essential elements and the calculated burden of based on the consumption were below the Recommended Dietary Allowances and Tolerable Upper Intake Levels.

Based on these results, the trace element content of seafood samples does not cover the necessity, recommended daily intake of essential metals, but due to their low levels the consumption of the investigated seafood poses no particular health hazard.

The Project is supported by the European Union and co-financed by the European Social Fund (grant agreement no. EFOP-3.6.2- 16-2017-00012, project title: Development of a product chain model for functional, healthy and safe foods from farm to fork based on a thematic research network)



List of lectures