Students' Research Circle    
 
 
2022
2021
2020
» 2019
Call for papers
The conference
Veterinary Session
Veterinary Jury
Biology Session
Sponsors
Awards-list
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
Home » Archive » 2019

TDK conference 2019

A coprological survey of parasites in black-striped capuchins (Cebus libidinosus) in a bolivian wildlife sanctuary
Mönich Marc Etienne - year 5
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Parasitology and Zoology
Supervisor: Dr. Róbert Farkas

Abstract:

Parasites are important components of our ecosystems, but the information available on gastrointestinal parasites of new-world monkeys remains sparse. This project aims to provide baseline data for future investigations of gastrointestinal parasites inhabiting Black-Striped capuchins.

In July and August 2018, feacal samples were collected from 68 monkeys living at Parque Machia, a wildlife sanctuary specializing in primate care located near Villa Tunari in the Chapare province of central Bolivia. The qualitative parasitological examination was done in the local laboratory using flotation technique with solutions of different density. Simple and centrifugal sedimentation tests were also used with ethyl-acetate for detecting heavier eggs. The larvae were isolated from fresh samples with modified Baermann method. Special descriptions helped the morphological identification of eggs and larvae.

The eggs of Prosthenorchis sp. (Acanthocephala), Paratriotaenia oedipomidatis (Cestoda), Strongyloides sp. and unidentified strongylids (Nematoda) were found. Forty-eight (70.6%) out of 68 monkeys were infected with one or more gastrointestinal parasite species. The faecal samples of 46 monkeys contained eggs of nematodes. The prevalence of Prosthenorchis sp. and Paratriotaenia oedipomidatis 19.1% (13/68) and 5.9% (4/68), respectively.

High prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites can be ascribed to high density of the monkeys in the centre, due to frequent and close contact with each other. On the other hand, wild primates from the surrounding jungle may also contribute to the infection of local animals.

The result of this study contributes to our knowledge about the parasitic infections of wild and captive monkeys of this species.



List of lectures