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Home » Archive » 2021

TDK conference 2021

Atlas of Veterinary Anatomy: The Chinchilla. Demonstrate the anatomy of a unique species by different technical methods of veterinary medicine including dissection, X-Ray and CT scan
Hélaudais Adeline - year 6
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Anatomy and Histology
Supervisor: Dr. Diana Hazai

Abstract:

The aim of the present work was to create an atlas that shows the anatomy of a chinchilla. The macroscopic anatomy of the animal is presented with images taken at autopsy and X-rays and CT scans of a live animal to provide veterinarians and researchers with a well-detailed clinical approach to the anatomy of the chinchilla.

Chinchilla is a special animal in many ways. The first is an economic aspect, because in Hungary the breeding of chinchillas for the use of their fur is very important.

The second aspect is the use of chinchilla as a model animal in medical research. This is because the tympanic bulla of the chinchilla (in the middle ear) has a similar structure to that of humans, which is why it is widely used in research on human deafness, for example.

The last aspect was the spread of chinchilla as a pet and therefore its appearance in veterinary practice.

It is therefore important to have adequate knowledge of the structures of the chinchilla’s body, so we aimed to make an easy-to-use anatomical atlas of it.

A study of the literature revealed that although there are detailed descriptions of chinchillas, they only cover certain organ systems of the animal, and a comprehensive presentation that we designed and prepared proved to be a fill.

In the course of our work over the past year, we dissected the bodies of several dead male and female chinchillas and documented the dissection with photographs. The completed images were then processed, labeled based on our anatomical knowledge, and inserted into the dissertation, supplemented by an explanation of the structures shown in the image. In the meantime, we managed to take CT and X-rays of a live chinchilla. With the completed X-rays, we focused more on the head and teeth, as their examination is the most common in veterinary practice, so presenting a healthy animal can help with healing.

We hope that the completed work will benefit all those who want to learn more about the anatomy of chinchilla.



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