Students' Research Circle    
 
 
» 2022
Call for papers
The conference
Veterinary Session
Jury
Sponsors
Awards-list
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
Home » Archive » 2022

TDK conference 2022

Molecular and epidemiological study of pigeon parasites
Sipos Gábor - year 5
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Parasitology and Zoology
Supervisor: Dr. Sándor Hornok

Abstract:

The aim of our first research was to analyse red and fowl mites for their genetic characters. During this study we found Dermanyssus gallinae lineage L1 for the first time in central Europe. Detailed morphological and molecular-phylogenetic analyses of D. gallinae lineage L1 confirmed its status as a cryptic species within D. gallinae (s.l.). We also found the first molecularly confirmed and phylogenetically analyzed urban case of O. sylviarum infestation of birds (house martins) in Hungary. Taking into account the well-documented latitudinal migratory routes of house martins between Hungary and Africa, O. sylviarum associated with this bird species most likely arrived on its host from the eastern Mediterranean region. In contrast, mites collected from pigeons in Hungary showed cox1 genetic homogeneity with North American O. sylviarum, which can only be explained by a long-distance connection of birds and their mites as part of human activity (e.g. transportation to exhibitions or trading).

During our second research we investigated Trichomonas gallinae which is a geographically widespread flagellated protozoan parasite of birds. We collected oropharyngeal swab samples in Hungary and Romania from 99 columbiform birds, including 76 feral pigeons (Columba livia domestica), four common wood pigeons (C. palumbus), 16 ring doves (S. risoria) and three Eurasian collared doves (S. decaocto). Following DNA extraction, these samples were analyzed for the presence of T. gallinae using molecular methods. Trichomonas gallinae was detected in all four examined bird species. Racing feral pigeons had significantly higher prevalence of T. gallinae infection (95%) than urban feral pigeons (33%). Among other columbiform bird species, the rate of PCR-positivity was the highest among wood pigeons (100%), also high (94%) among ring doves and low among collared doves (33%). The occurrence of some genotypes appeared to be related to host species and locality. Clinical signs were associated with only one genotype. The results suggest that most of the detected T. gallinae genotypes are not host-specific and do not cause clinical signs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the genetic diversity of T. gallinae in Hungary, Romania and the whole southeastern European region. In conclusion, significantly more captive than free-living columbiform birds had T. gallinae infection.



List of lectures