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Effects of the naturally occurring inhabitants of the vaginal microbiota of cows on cultured endometrial cells
Yiannaki Vania - year 5
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Supervisors: Dr. György Csikó, Dr. Orsolya Palócz

Abstract:

One of the main causes of the dairy industry’s significant financial losses is bovine subfertility. Even though bacterial infections frequently contribute to reproductive problems, limited data is describing the normal vaginal microbiota of the cow. Determining the microbial colonies found in the reproductive canal of the cow may allow us to better understand the physiology of the animal’s reproductive system, which has great commercial significance. The postpartum uterine inflamed cows are now treated with antibiotics, hormones, and antiseptic agents. Specific concerns arise since there is high incidence of microbial resistance, drug residues in milk and meat production cost increase which indicates lack of efficiency of those treatments. As suggested from previous studies, intravaginal probiotic bacteria have reduced uterine infections, enhanced immune responses, and increased milk production. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of naturally occurring inhabitants of the vaginal microbiota of cows on cultured bovine endometrial cells, in vitro. Furthermore, to prevent the inflammation of the uterus with beneficial bacteria from normal microbiota of the vagina. Primary bovine endometrial cells were co-cultured with Trueperella pyogenes, which according to previous literature was found to be linked to postpartum uterine illness. For prevention of Trueperella pyogenes-caused cell-damage; potentially beneficial bacteria, which was isolated from healthy cow’s reproductive tract, were added to the cell cultures. After the treatment mRNA was isolated from the endometrial epithelial cells. Following reverse transcription PCR, the level of selected inflammatory markers was assessed via quantitative PCR. Our results suggest that the naturally occurring inhabitants of the vaginal microbiota of cows can be beneficial in eliminating the harmful effects caused by invading pathogens. Further in vivo research is needed in order to prove our in vitro findings.



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