Students' Research Circle    
 
 
Call for papers
The conference
Veterinary Session
Veterinary Jury
Biology Session
Sponsors
Awards-list
Galleries
» Archive
2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
Regulations
Home » Archive

Archive

Novel therapies in cats with FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis) : literature review and retrospective study with GS441524
Garrido Linnéa, Josée - year 5
University of Veterinary Medicine Budapest, Department of Internal Medicine
Supervisor: Dr. Zsuzsanna Vizi

Abstract:

The Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus, a pathogenic mutation of the Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV), causes a widespread infectious disease called Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP). Considered particularly lethal and originating from a very contagious widespread virus (FECV), this disorder, still to this day, does not have a proper diagnostic pathway since our current diagnostic methods and tools are not specific nor sensitive enough for this purpose. Furthermore, no official treatment protocol is available on the veterinary pharmaceutical market. Several protocols, both supportive and preventive-based have been tested throughout the years of fight against FIP, none of them having shown interesting results, except for the GS-441524, a nucleoside analogue antiviral drug. Several studies have shown the hopeful outcome of FIP cats treated with this molecule. However, the drug is not presently licensed for veterinary use and not available legally on the market.

The purpose of this research was to gather data from the owner of FIP cats, who privately purchased and treated their cats with the GS molecule, in order to provide fundamental insights on the effect of this drug has on these originally considered “lost” animals. This retrospective study was based on a questionnaire which received 503 answers from 24 different countries. Amongst the 494 answers to the question regarding the treatment’s outcome, 57,7% (285 cats) were listed as completely recovered from FIP after the treatment, while 35,8% (117 cats) were still receiving the treatment and seeing positive improvement of the FIP symptoms. Additionally, 11,3% (56 cats) had completed the usual 84 treatment protocol but were still in the observation period to monitor for any relapse – which at the time of the questionnaire was not present. Lastly, in 1,2% of the answers (6 cats), the recovery was successful solely after an increase in dose or treatment time compared to the protocol advised originally, meaning that the actual number of cats recovered from the treatment is 58,9% (291 cats). The minor side-effects seen from the therapy are ones that could be palliated thanks to supportive therapy, unlike the original much graver FIP symptoms and clinical signs.

While additional research is needed on this drug molecule, the data reveals itself to be promising.

-



List of lectures